So amazing! The Archives of American Art just shared these IBM punch cards utilized by Frederick Hammersley to create computer drawings in 1969, during his time teaching at the University of New Mexico.
We will be mounting an exhibition of Hammersley’s computer drawings from this time period, opening on January 17 — just a few weeks away!
An illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition, which includes foreword by Elizabeth East, original text by Frederick Hammersley (first published by Leonardo magazine in 1969), as well as over 20 computer drawings reproduced.
archivesofamericanart:


What’s new in our image gallery: these punched cards from the University of New Mexico which contain a code for making art by Frederick Hammersley. Such a fantastic piece of ephemera from the very early days of computing. Hammersley describes his process in an accompanying typed page and gives some background: “an engineer at the University…invited the painting faculty to experiment with the computer in a way the computer was not intended to be used.”
Punched cards for computer art by Frederick Hammersley, 1969 Mar. 20. Frederick Hammersley papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

So amazing! The Archives of American Art just shared these IBM punch cards utilized by Frederick Hammersley to create computer drawings in 1969, during his time teaching at the University of New Mexico.

We will be mounting an exhibition of Hammersley’s computer drawings from this time period, opening on January 17 — just a few weeks away!

An illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition, which includes foreword by Elizabeth East, original text by Frederick Hammersley (first published by Leonardo magazine in 1969), as well as over 20 computer drawings reproduced.

archivesofamericanart:

What’s new in our image gallery: these punched cards from the University of New Mexico which contain a code for making art by Frederick Hammersley. Such a fantastic piece of ephemera from the very early days of computing. Hammersley describes his process in an accompanying typed page and gives some background: “an engineer at the University…invited the painting faculty to experiment with the computer in a way the computer was not intended to be used.”

Punched cards for computer art by Frederick Hammersley, 1969 Mar. 20. Frederick Hammersley papers, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.