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Ed and Nancy Kienholz, White Easel with Machine Pistol, 1979

"The gun was found at an Idaho flea market. It is a mock-up of a machine gun made from the slide of one gun, a barrel from another, and some made-up wooden frame. We could never figure our why anyone would make such a gun." — Nancy Reddin Kienholz

This is one of the works currently on view in our exhibition Kienholz: Berlin/Hope, through April 16. Read more about this series in the catalogue produced for our exhibition, which is completely accessible online. 

If you’re looking to see Alison Saar’s work in person, chances are you might be able to find her sculpture or works on a paper in a museum near you! Here’s a round-up of all her current and upcoming activities:
"Initial Public Offering: New Works from SJMA’s Permanent Collection" (group exhibition), San Jose Museum of Art, CA, through April 24, 2014
"In Residence: Contemporary Artists at Dartmouth" (group exhibition), Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, through July 6, 2014
"African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center" (group exhibition), The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Cultre at Levine Center for the Arts, through June 15, 2014 (traveling)
Coming up next:
"Hothouse" (solo exhibition), Noah Purifoy Gallery, Watts Towers Art Center, CA, 19 April - 10 August 2014
"Women and Print" (group exhibition), Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, August 30 - October, 2014
IMAGE: Alison Saar, Foison, 2011, Carved wood clad in green patina copper sheeting with cast bronze cotton balls and moths, and acrylic paint, 72 H x 22 x 16 in. (182.9 x 55.9 x 40.6 cm)

If you’re looking to see Alison Saar’s work in person, chances are you might be able to find her sculpture or works on a paper in a museum near you! Here’s a round-up of all her current and upcoming activities:

"Initial Public Offering: New Works from SJMA’s Permanent Collection" (group exhibition), San Jose Museum of Art, CA, through April 24, 2014

"In Residence: Contemporary Artists at Dartmouth" (group exhibition), Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, through July 6, 2014

"African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center" (group exhibition), The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Cultre at Levine Center for the Arts, through June 15, 2014 (traveling)

Coming up next:

"Hothouse" (solo exhibition), Noah Purifoy Gallery, Watts Towers Art Center, CA, 19 April - 10 August 2014

"Women and Print" (group exhibition), Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, August 30 - October, 2014

IMAGE: Alison Saar, Foison, 2011, Carved wood clad in green patina copper sheeting with cast bronze cotton balls and moths, and acrylic paint, 72 H x 22 x 16 in. (182.9 x 55.9 x 40.6 cm)

Over 100 prints by David Hockney, that span more than 50 years, are on view at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in the UK. Focusing on his etchings and lithographs, the exhibition examines Hockney’s fascination with printmaking, from his early etchings as a student at the Royal College, to his most recent experimentation with computer prints. 
In fact, one of the earliest etchings in the exhibition is the mock diploma Hockney created in protest to the Royal College’s decision to withhold his diploma, when he refused to submit a final paper claiming that his merits should be judged on his work, not his words.
Click here to see a video of the exhibition installation. “Hockney, Printmaker” will remain on view through 11 May 2014.
IMAGE: David Hockney, “The Diploma,” 1962, etching with aquatint in black and red

Over 100 prints by David Hockney, that span more than 50 years, are on view at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in the UK. Focusing on his etchings and lithographs, the exhibition examines Hockney’s fascination with printmaking, from his early etchings as a student at the Royal College, to his most recent experimentation with computer prints. 

In fact, one of the earliest etchings in the exhibition is the mock diploma Hockney created in protest to the Royal College’s decision to withhold his diploma, when he refused to submit a final paper claiming that his merits should be judged on his work, not his words.

Click here to see a video of the exhibition installation. “Hockney, Printmaker” will remain on view through 11 May 2014.

IMAGE: David Hockney, “The Diploma,” 1962, etching with aquatint in black and red

In 1959, curator and critic Jules Langsner brought together work by hard-edge painters Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley and Lorser Feitelson in a historic exhibition at LACMA titled the “Four Abstract Classacists.” Frederick Hammersley shed light on the originations of the term “abstract classicists” in his oral history, commissioned by L.A. Louver in 2003 and conducted by Lawrence Weschler, Douglas Dreishpoon and Peter Goulds:

"When the four of us had the show in ’59, we had meetings about what to call ourselves.  And I was embarrassed.  Well, it’s embarrassing, what do you call yourself?  Well, you have a job and it’s called such and such.  That’s helpful…  So we had the meeting and it ended up we were going to call ourselves Abstract Classicists…  Rico [Lebrun] made a remark.  “A classic work is everything is revealed.  A baroque is revealed, concealed.”  And I thought that’s very interesting.  Very Giottoish.  Classic.  Everything is up there.  No shadows.” — Frederick Hammersley 
(extracted from the transcriptions by UCLA’s Oral History Program)

See work by these 4 artists in a re-staging of this seminal exhibition at LACMA, on view through June 29. For more information and a selection of works on view, visit LACMA’s website.
To learn about Hammersley’s rich exhibition history at L.A. Louver, visit our Gallery History (THEN) page for a complete listing of all his shows.
IMAGE: Jules Langser, Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley, Lorser Feitelson, 1959, Frederick Hammersly: An Oral History, Volume 2

In 1959, curator and critic Jules Langsner brought together work by hard-edge painters Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley and Lorser Feitelson in a historic exhibition at LACMA titled the “Four Abstract Classacists.” Frederick Hammersley shed light on the originations of the term “abstract classicists” in his oral history, commissioned by L.A. Louver in 2003 and conducted by Lawrence Weschler, Douglas Dreishpoon and Peter Goulds:

"When the four of us had the show in ’59, we had meetings about what to call ourselves.  And I was embarrassed.  Well, it’s embarrassing, what do you call yourself?  Well, you have a job and it’s called such and such.  That’s helpful…  So we had the meeting and it ended up we were going to call ourselves Abstract Classicists…  Rico [Lebrun] made a remark.  “A classic work is everything is revealed.  A baroque is revealed, concealed.”  And I thought that’s very interesting.  Very Giottoish.  Classic.  Everything is up there.  No shadows.” — Frederick Hammersley

(extracted from the transcriptions by UCLA’s Oral History Program)

See work by these 4 artists in a re-staging of this seminal exhibition at LACMA, on view through June 29. For more information and a selection of works on view, visit LACMA’s website.

To learn about Hammersley’s rich exhibition history at L.A. Louver, visit our Gallery History (THEN) page for a complete listing of all his shows.

IMAGE: Jules Langser, Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley, Lorser Feitelson, 1959, Frederick Hammersly: An Oral History, Volume 2

ARTIST CONVERSATION EVENT: 
Gajin Fujita with Ilona Katzew
Thursday, 17 April 2014, 7pm // @ L.A. Louver
Join us for a lively conversation with Gajin Fujita and Ilona Katzew (Curator at LACMA) in the context of the artist’s current drawings exhibition. Light refreshments will be served. Conversation begins promptly at 7pm. Validated parking provided!
L.A. Louver / 45 N Venice Blvd, Venice, CA 90291
The event is free, but space is limited. Please rsvp to 310.822.4855 or rsvp@lalouver.com.
Click here for a film documenting Gajin Fujita and his drawing process.

ARTIST CONVERSATION EVENT: 

Gajin Fujita with Ilona Katzew

Thursday, 17 April 2014, 7pm // @ L.A. Louver

Join us for a lively conversation with Gajin Fujita and Ilona Katzew (Curator at LACMA) in the context of the artist’s current drawings exhibitionLight refreshments will be served. Conversation begins promptly at 7pm. Validated parking provided!

L.A. Louver / 45 N Venice Blvd, Venice, CA 90291

The event is free, but space is limited. Please rsvp to 310.822.4855 or rsvp@lalouver.com.

Click here for a film documenting Gajin Fujita and his drawing process.

Ed and Nancy Kienholz, White Easel with Face, 1978

"The wax face came from Dennis Hopper. Dennis had found, and subsequently sold to Ed, a whole prop trunk (approximately 40 x 36 x 18 inches large) full of World World II wax faces and torsos. These were used to teach soldiers the effects of syphilis, and to illustrate its horrible symptoms. One of these heads was also used inside the resin head of the black man in Five Car Stud.” — Nancy Reddin Kienholz

See White Easel with Face in our current exhibition Kienholz: Berlin/Hope, on view through April 26. And to learn more about The White Easel series, check out the e-catalogue produced for the exhibition, which includes commentary on this series by Nancy Reddin Kienholz and former Kienholz studio assistant, Rich Post.

Ben Jackel is holding artist demonstrations at Fullerton College this week (March 24-27), as part of the Artist in Residency program. Observe his masterful application of sculpture techniques and materials in this rare opportunity to see the artist at work. 
Here’s the complete schedule:
In Room 1020
March 24, 25, 26, 27, 9:00 - 11:00am
March 24, 25, 27, 12:00 - 3:30pm
Visit the college’s Facebook page for more information on programming.

Ben Jackel is holding artist demonstrations at Fullerton College this week (March 24-27), as part of the Artist in Residency program. Observe his masterful application of sculpture techniques and materials in this rare opportunity to see the artist at work. 

Here’s the complete schedule:

In Room 1020

March 24, 25, 26, 27, 9:00 - 11:00am

March 24, 25, 27, 12:00 - 3:30pm

Visit the college’s Facebook page for more information on programming.

Michael C. McMillen has been busy amassing “age-enhanced materials” for his forthcoming installation at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris this fall. Here are few teasers of what he has in store. More to come!

Spring is officially here! At what better way to welcome the season than with this painting by Charles Garabedian. Titled The Spring for Which I Longed (2001-03), this massive work measuring 144 x 288 in., was most recently shown in Garabedian’s Retrospective at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art in 2011. The image below is an installation shot from the exhibition the reflects the painting’s enormous scale. 

IMAGE: Charles Garabedian, The Spring for Which I Longed, 2001 - 2003, acrylic on canvas, 144 x 288 in. (365.8 x 731.5 cm)

Three sculptures by Gwynn Murrill are on view at the Honolulu Museum of Art in Natural Unnatural Supernatural, an exhibition focused on themes of nature, from wildlife, flora and fauna, landscapes and seascapes.
Including both artists from Hawaii and all over the United States, the show will remain on view through November 2.
Learn more here.
IMAGE: Gwynn Murrill, Lying Dog, 1986, bronze, 12.5 x 37 x 24 in.

Three sculptures by Gwynn Murrill are on view at the Honolulu Museum of Art in Natural Unnatural Supernatural, an exhibition focused on themes of nature, from wildlife, flora and fauna, landscapes and seascapes.

Including both artists from Hawaii and all over the United States, the show will remain on view through November 2.

Learn more here.

IMAGE: Gwynn Murrill, Lying Dog, 1986, bronze, 12.5 x 37 x 24 in.