spacer
spacer la louver logo
Home Now Next Then Artists Rogue Wave Publications Info Blog

The White Easel series, by Ed and Nancy Kienholz, were some of the first works to manifest from their newly built studio in Hope, Idaho, where the couple relocated in 1973. Many were made whilst the studio was still under construction, utilizing left over building materials as a basis. Former Kienholz studio assistant Rich Post shares his first hand account with these works:

"When the initial part of the new studio in Idaho was complete, it was a formidable space to be dealt with, and it was not the only thing going on in this world. Construction continued all around, and yet Ed and Nancy’s need and desire to make art never stopped… the overriding visual component was the wall. There was no denying its presence. Finally, the wall itself became an element in many of the works. The 4 x 4 inch timbers, the cinder block wall, and the lights were all rigged to give the points that Ed desired. The replica background wall and easel were built to convey the studio space that had to be confronted." — Rich Post

See these works and more in our current exhibition Kienholz: Berlin/Hope, on view through April 26th. Click here to view the catalogue produced for the show.

IMAGES: (top) Edward & Nancy Reddin Kienholz, White Easel with Wooden Hand, 1978; (bottom) Kienholz studio in Hope, Idaho, 1975

This is the last week for “Portraits, Abstractions, and the In-between: Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley,” on view at the Pomona College Museum of Art through April 13, 2014. The solo exhibition features a selection of paintings, drawings and prints that were produced over the artist’s 60-year career and reflect Hammersley’s varied approach to art making.
IMAGE: Frederick Hammersley, Up With In, 1957-8, Painting, 48 x 36 in., Museum purchase with funds provided by the Estate of Walter and Elise Mosher

This is the last week for “Portraits, Abstractions, and the In-between: Gathering the Work of Frederick Hammersley,” on view at the Pomona College Museum of Art through April 13, 2014. The solo exhibition features a selection of paintings, drawings and prints that were produced over the artist’s 60-year career and reflect Hammersley’s varied approach to art making.

IMAGE: Frederick Hammersley, Up With In, 1957-8, Painting, 48 x 36 in., Museum purchase with funds provided by the Estate of Walter and Elise Mosher

Rina Banerjee is busy at work in her New York studio preparing for her upcoming solo exhibition at L.A. Louver. Opening in May 2014, this will be her first West Coast solo show and will include works on paper, paintings and sculptures. 
Stay tuned for a video we’re producing on Banerjee that touches on her background and new works. 

Rina Banerjee is busy at work in her New York studio preparing for her upcoming solo exhibition at L.A. Louver. Opening in May 2014, this will be her first West Coast solo show and will include works on paper, paintings and sculptures. 

Stay tuned for a video we’re producing on Banerjee that touches on her background and new works. 

Measuring nearly 12 ft. tall, this towering sculpture by Peter Shelton ”littlesister” is on view at the Palms Springs Art Museum. Titled California Dreamin’: Thirty Years of Collecting, the group exhibition features artworks from the museum collection since 1984. Select artists include Llyn Foulkes, Helen Pashgian, Jim Isermann, Ed Ruscha and Anselm Kiefer; as well as fellow L.A. Louver artists David Hockney, Michael C. McMillen and Enrique Martínez Celaya.
To lean more about Peter Shelton’s work, here’s a video we produced for his L.A. Louver exhibition in 2011. 
IMAGE: Peter Shelton, littlesister, 1999, fiberglass and polyester resin embedded with wire, 132 x 32 in. (335 x 81 cm.)

Measuring nearly 12 ft. tall, this towering sculpture by Peter Shelton ”littlesister” is on view at the Palms Springs Art Museum. Titled California Dreamin’: Thirty Years of Collecting, the group exhibition features artworks from the museum collection since 1984. Select artists include Llyn Foulkes, Helen Pashgian, Jim Isermann, Ed Ruscha and Anselm Kiefer; as well as fellow L.A. Louver artists David Hockney, Michael C. McMillen and Enrique Martínez Celaya.

To lean more about Peter Shelton’s work, here’s a video we produced for his L.A. Louver exhibition in 2011. 

IMAGE: Peter Shelton, littlesister, 1999, fiberglass and polyester resin embedded with wire, 132 x 32 in. (335 x 81 cm.)

Gajin Fujita received early recognition and critical praise for the two person exhibition Contemporary 9: Gajin Fujita and Pablo Vargas Lugo, curated by Ilona Katzew at LACMA in 2005. Featuring a selection of Fujita’s paintings, Katzew also included a number of drawings by the artist — making this the first time Fujita’s drawings would be seen publicly.
In the exhibition’s brochure, Katzew explained the role of drawings in Fujita’s work and their importance to his practice:
"While Fujita’s paintings are characterized by a dedication to detail and laborious craftsmanship, his drawings — shown for the first time in the exhibition — are more fortuitous. He begins by projecting images onto pieces of paper, which he traces with pencils and markers, invariably altering the source. He then cuts out the images to make stencils, which are used to create the figures in the paintings. The stencils themselves become the preparatory drawings or "blueprints of the originals," as Fujita describes them), which present random traces of spray paint and imprints of the triangular weights that he uses to hold the stencils on place."
Click here for more works from the 2005 LACMA exhibition and a review of the show in the LA Times by Christopher Miles.
An exhibition of Fujita’s drawings is currently on view at L.A. Louver through April 26, 2014.
Join us for a lively conversation with Gajin Fujita and Ilona Katzew at L.A. Louver on Thursday, April 17. Visit our website for more info.
IMAGE: Gajin Fujita, Study of Samurai, Shoreline Duel (2), 2005, spraypaint, marker and pencil on paper, 59 x 45 1/2 in. (149.9 x 115.6 cm), Private collection.

Gajin Fujita received early recognition and critical praise for the two person exhibition Contemporary 9: Gajin Fujita and Pablo Vargas Lugo, curated by Ilona Katzew at LACMA in 2005. Featuring a selection of Fujita’s paintings, Katzew also included a number of drawings by the artist — making this the first time Fujita’s drawings would be seen publicly.

In the exhibition’s brochure, Katzew explained the role of drawings in Fujita’s work and their importance to his practice:

"While Fujita’s paintings are characterized by a dedication to detail and laborious craftsmanship, his drawings — shown for the first time in the exhibition — are more fortuitous. He begins by projecting images onto pieces of paper, which he traces with pencils and markers, invariably altering the source. He then cuts out the images to make stencils, which are used to create the figures in the paintings. The stencils themselves become the preparatory drawings or "blueprints of the originals," as Fujita describes them), which present random traces of spray paint and imprints of the triangular weights that he uses to hold the stencils on place."

Click here for more works from the 2005 LACMA exhibition and a review of the show in the LA Times by Christopher Miles.

An exhibition of Fujita’s drawings is currently on view at L.A. Louver through April 26, 2014.

Join us for a lively conversation with Gajin Fujita and Ilona Katzew at L.A. Louver on Thursday, April 17. Visit our website for more info.

IMAGE: Gajin Fujita, Study of Samurai, Shoreline Duel (2), 2005, spraypaint, marker and pencil on paper, 59 x 45 1/2 in. (149.9 x 115.6 cm), Private collection.

Ed and Nancy Kienholz, White Easel with Machine Pistol, 1979

"The gun was found at an Idaho flea market. It is a mock-up of a machine gun made from the slide of one gun, a barrel from another, and some made-up wooden frame. We could never figure our why anyone would make such a gun." — Nancy Reddin Kienholz

This is one of the works currently on view in our exhibition Kienholz: Berlin/Hope, through April 16. Read more about this series in the catalogue produced for our exhibition, which is completely accessible online. 

If you’re looking to see Alison Saar’s work in person, chances are you might be able to find her sculpture or works on a paper in a museum near you! Here’s a round-up of all her current and upcoming activities:
"Initial Public Offering: New Works from SJMA’s Permanent Collection" (group exhibition), San Jose Museum of Art, CA, through April 24, 2014
"In Residence: Contemporary Artists at Dartmouth" (group exhibition), Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, through July 6, 2014
"African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center" (group exhibition), The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Cultre at Levine Center for the Arts, through June 15, 2014 (traveling)
Coming up next:
"Hothouse" (solo exhibition), Noah Purifoy Gallery, Watts Towers Art Center, CA, 19 April - 10 August 2014
"Women and Print" (group exhibition), Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, August 30 - October, 2014
IMAGE: Alison Saar, Foison, 2011, Carved wood clad in green patina copper sheeting with cast bronze cotton balls and moths, and acrylic paint, 72 H x 22 x 16 in. (182.9 x 55.9 x 40.6 cm)

If you’re looking to see Alison Saar’s work in person, chances are you might be able to find her sculpture or works on a paper in a museum near you! Here’s a round-up of all her current and upcoming activities:

"Initial Public Offering: New Works from SJMA’s Permanent Collection" (group exhibition), San Jose Museum of Art, CA, through April 24, 2014

"In Residence: Contemporary Artists at Dartmouth" (group exhibition), Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, through July 6, 2014

"African American Art Since 1950: Perspectives from the David C. Driskell Center" (group exhibition), The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Cultre at Levine Center for the Arts, through June 15, 2014 (traveling)

Coming up next:

"Hothouse" (solo exhibition), Noah Purifoy Gallery, Watts Towers Art Center, CA, 19 April - 10 August 2014

"Women and Print" (group exhibition), Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery, Scripps College, Claremont, CA, August 30 - October, 2014

IMAGE: Alison Saar, Foison, 2011, Carved wood clad in green patina copper sheeting with cast bronze cotton balls and moths, and acrylic paint, 72 H x 22 x 16 in. (182.9 x 55.9 x 40.6 cm)

Over 100 prints by David Hockney, that span more than 50 years, are on view at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in the UK. Focusing on his etchings and lithographs, the exhibition examines Hockney’s fascination with printmaking, from his early etchings as a student at the Royal College, to his most recent experimentation with computer prints. 
In fact, one of the earliest etchings in the exhibition is the mock diploma Hockney created in protest to the Royal College’s decision to withhold his diploma, when he refused to submit a final paper claiming that his merits should be judged on his work, not his words.
Click here to see a video of the exhibition installation. “Hockney, Printmaker” will remain on view through 11 May 2014.
IMAGE: David Hockney, “The Diploma,” 1962, etching with aquatint in black and red

Over 100 prints by David Hockney, that span more than 50 years, are on view at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in the UK. Focusing on his etchings and lithographs, the exhibition examines Hockney’s fascination with printmaking, from his early etchings as a student at the Royal College, to his most recent experimentation with computer prints. 

In fact, one of the earliest etchings in the exhibition is the mock diploma Hockney created in protest to the Royal College’s decision to withhold his diploma, when he refused to submit a final paper claiming that his merits should be judged on his work, not his words.

Click here to see a video of the exhibition installation. “Hockney, Printmaker” will remain on view through 11 May 2014.

IMAGE: David Hockney, “The Diploma,” 1962, etching with aquatint in black and red

In 1959, curator and critic Jules Langsner brought together work by hard-edge painters Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley and Lorser Feitelson in a historic exhibition at LACMA titled the “Four Abstract Classacists.” Frederick Hammersley shed light on the originations of the term “abstract classicists” in his oral history, commissioned by L.A. Louver in 2003 and conducted by Lawrence Weschler, Douglas Dreishpoon and Peter Goulds:

"When the four of us had the show in ’59, we had meetings about what to call ourselves.  And I was embarrassed.  Well, it’s embarrassing, what do you call yourself?  Well, you have a job and it’s called such and such.  That’s helpful…  So we had the meeting and it ended up we were going to call ourselves Abstract Classicists…  Rico [Lebrun] made a remark.  “A classic work is everything is revealed.  A baroque is revealed, concealed.”  And I thought that’s very interesting.  Very Giottoish.  Classic.  Everything is up there.  No shadows.” — Frederick Hammersley 
(extracted from the transcriptions by UCLA’s Oral History Program)

See work by these 4 artists in a re-staging of this seminal exhibition at LACMA, on view through June 29. For more information and a selection of works on view, visit LACMA’s website.
To learn about Hammersley’s rich exhibition history at L.A. Louver, visit our Gallery History (THEN) page for a complete listing of all his shows.
IMAGE: Jules Langser, Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley, Lorser Feitelson, 1959, Frederick Hammersly: An Oral History, Volume 2

In 1959, curator and critic Jules Langsner brought together work by hard-edge painters Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley and Lorser Feitelson in a historic exhibition at LACMA titled the “Four Abstract Classacists.” Frederick Hammersley shed light on the originations of the term “abstract classicists” in his oral history, commissioned by L.A. Louver in 2003 and conducted by Lawrence Weschler, Douglas Dreishpoon and Peter Goulds:

"When the four of us had the show in ’59, we had meetings about what to call ourselves.  And I was embarrassed.  Well, it’s embarrassing, what do you call yourself?  Well, you have a job and it’s called such and such.  That’s helpful…  So we had the meeting and it ended up we were going to call ourselves Abstract Classicists…  Rico [Lebrun] made a remark.  “A classic work is everything is revealed.  A baroque is revealed, concealed.”  And I thought that’s very interesting.  Very Giottoish.  Classic.  Everything is up there.  No shadows.” — Frederick Hammersley

(extracted from the transcriptions by UCLA’s Oral History Program)

See work by these 4 artists in a re-staging of this seminal exhibition at LACMA, on view through June 29. For more information and a selection of works on view, visit LACMA’s website.

To learn about Hammersley’s rich exhibition history at L.A. Louver, visit our Gallery History (THEN) page for a complete listing of all his shows.

IMAGE: Jules Langser, Karl Benjamin, John McLaughlin, Frederick Hammersley, Lorser Feitelson, 1959, Frederick Hammersly: An Oral History, Volume 2

ARTIST CONVERSATION EVENT: 
Gajin Fujita with Ilona Katzew
Thursday, 17 April 2014, 7pm // @ L.A. Louver
Join us for a lively conversation with Gajin Fujita and Ilona Katzew (Curator at LACMA) in the context of the artist’s current drawings exhibition. Light refreshments will be served. Conversation begins promptly at 7pm. Validated parking provided!
L.A. Louver / 45 N Venice Blvd, Venice, CA 90291
The event is free, but space is limited. Please rsvp to 310.822.4855 or rsvp@lalouver.com.
Click here for a film documenting Gajin Fujita and his drawing process.

ARTIST CONVERSATION EVENT: 

Gajin Fujita with Ilona Katzew

Thursday, 17 April 2014, 7pm // @ L.A. Louver

Join us for a lively conversation with Gajin Fujita and Ilona Katzew (Curator at LACMA) in the context of the artist’s current drawings exhibitionLight refreshments will be served. Conversation begins promptly at 7pm. Validated parking provided!

L.A. Louver / 45 N Venice Blvd, Venice, CA 90291

The event is free, but space is limited. Please rsvp to 310.822.4855 or rsvp@lalouver.com.

Click here for a film documenting Gajin Fujita and his drawing process.